Category Archives: LexisNexis

Practicing Attorney Legal Research Panel TOMORROW

What: Practicing attorney legal research panel.  Lunch from Potbelly’s Sandwich Shop provided.
Who: All interested students are welcome.  Please RSVP if you would like lunch.
Where: College of Law Room 105
When: Tuesday, March 24th, 12:15-1:15pm
Questions? Contact Tara Mospan (tara.mospan@asu.edu)  to RSVP or for more information.

Research panel flyer - 2015

Practicing Attorney Research Panel

Join us for a Q&A session with a panel of four practicing attorneys, sponsored by the Women Law Students’ Association, the Ross-Blakley Law Library, and LexisNexis.  The attorneys will discuss strategies for success in summer and post-graduation legal research projects and answer any questions students may have about legal research in practice, including cost considerations. Lunch from Potbelly’s Sandwich Shop will be provided.

Who: All interested students are welcome.  Please RSVP if you would like lunch.

Where: College of Law Room 105

When: Tuesday, March 24th, 12:15-1:15pm

Questions? Contact Tara Mospan (tara.mospan@asu.edu)  to RSVP or for more information.

Research panel info sheet

Summer Use of Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law

Westlaw
Your Westlaw password will remain active over the summer for a limited number of research hours.  Westlaw does allow full summer access for the following permissible uses:

  • Law school class
  • Law Review or Journal work
  • Moot Court work
  • Project for a Professor
  • Unpaid, nonprofit public-interest internship/externship pro bono work required for graduation

To extend your Westlaw access
Eligible students will need to register for a password extension and must agree to only use their password for permissible purposes.  To register for a password Summer Extension visit    http://lawschool.westlaw.com/registration/summerextension.asp.

Access to Westlaw for graduates
Graduating students can register for the Westlaw Grad Elite Extension Program that will extend their access to WestlawNext and Westlaw Classic through November 2014 to prepare for the bar exam.  To register for the Grad Elite Extension visit http://lawschool.westlaw.com/registration/gradelite.aspx.

If you have any questions please contact our Westlaw Academic Account Manager, Kristen Knepper, at kristen.knepper@thomsonreuters.com.

LexisNexis
You will have unlimited access to your Lexis Advance account over the summer for any use, including paid positions.

Access to Lexis Advance for graduates
Graduating students can register for a Lexis Graduate Program ID that will extend their access through December 2014 to prepare for the bar exam. To register, visit www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access.

If you have any questions please contact our Account Executive, Dana Shimo, at  dana.shimo@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law
You will have unlimited access to your Bloomberg Law account during the summer for any use, including paid positions.

Access to Bloomberg Law for Graduates
Graduating students will have unlimited access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

If you have any questions, please contact our Bloomberg Law representative, Will Thompson, at wthompson@bna.com.

Copyright Lawsuit Against Westlaw and LexisNexis

Westlaw and LexisNexis have been publishing publicly filed legal briefs and motions, and charging their subscription users to access them online, for years.  Two attorneys, Oklahoma lawyer Edward White and New York city lawyer Kenneth Elan, plan to put a stop to it.   White and Elan recently filed a class action lawsuit against Westlaw and LexisNexis, claiming copyright infringement of the aforementioned legal documents.   They seek to represent both lawyers who have copyrighted their work and those who have not, and claim that the two publishing companies have engaged in “unabashed wholesale copying of thousands of copyright-protected works created by, and owned by, the attorneys and law firms who authored them.”

Read the full complaint here.

What do you think of this lawsuit?  Does it have a solid legal footing?  Or, as some have stated, do you think that the strength of the copyright claim is undermined by the fact that many legal opinions are based on other people’s arguments and analysis?

Legislative History Research Resources

Legislative history research got you down? Here are some great resources to help you navigate the waters.

Research Guides:

 

CALI lessons:

 

Tutorials:

 
 
Webinars:
 
ProQuest has several upcoming webinars for thier Congressional Digital Suite and Legislative Insight (webinars are free, but you must register):

These webinars aim to help you:

1. Develop an understanding of the legislative process both:

a. Procedurally – How did the language read as first proposed, what committees considered the proposal, when were amendments made and where was the proposal when it was amended;
b. As an adversarial process – who was lobbying in support of the proposal and what were they trying to accomplish, who was active in opposition what were their objections, who was responsible for amendments to the proposal;2. Become familiar with the documents available pertinent to your issue;3. Identify where in the process the changes you care about occurred – this provides a mechanism to narrow the scope of your search for explanations for why the language was changed;4. Learn how to identify both direct and circumstantial evidence of intent.