Category Archives: Arizona & Local

The Cowgirl Who Became a Justice: Sandra Day O’Connor

After final exams are over and you have some free time on your hands again, you may be interested in checking out a new exhibit which traces Sandra Day O’Connor’s life through photographs, artifacts, and other visual imagery.  The exhibition, titled “The Cowgirl Who Became a Justice: Sandra Day O’Connor,” examines the intersection and divergence of the ranch life of O’Connor’s childhood and her years spent as a judge in both Arizona and Washington, D.C. It runs through May 23rd at the McClelland Irish Library at the Irish Cultural Center in downtown Phoenix.

Diane Humetewa Confirmed to Federal Judgeship

Congratulations to ASU’s Diane Humetewa on her historic appointment to the U. S. District Court for  Arizona.  The  U. S.  Senate voted unanimously to confirm her yesterday, Wednesday, May 14th!

Library Resources for Bar Exam Prep

For many law graduates, studying for the July bar exam has commenced.  We want to remind you that the Law Library is open to ASU law graduates studying for the bar and that there are a number of bar preparation materials in the Library collection that may be helpful to you in the coming months:

Be sure to also consult the resources in the Study Skills Collection, which include books on bar exam subjects and best practices for bar preparation:

  • Emanuel’s Law Outlines: Secured Transactions (2011)
    Another new book in the Law Library, Emanuel’s Secured Transactions outline provides a comprehensive breakdown of the topic into outline format with both summary and detailed versions of the main issues within secured transactions.

Out of Order book reading and signing event with Justice O’Connor

Hopefully you signed up early to attend Thursday’s book-signing event for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s book reading and signing event for her new book Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court. This event is now sold out; Out of Order is out of tickets!

If you’ll miss the event, you can check out the book from the Law Library’s collection or purchase it from event co-host Changing Hands Bookstore or other retailers. We also found this recent NPR interview with Justice O’Connor about the book (39 min).

Sandra Day O'Connor 1981 visit to ASU Law School

From the College of Law archives: Sandra Day O'Connor signs authographs in a 1981 visit to the ASU College of Law













New Books at the Law Library – Manifest Injustice

Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom
By Barry Siegel
Law Treatises KF224.M18 S56 2013

Manifest Injustice, by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Barry Siegel, details the story of Bill Macumber and the efforts of the Arizona Justice Project, led by lawyer Larry Hammond and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Professor Bob Bartels, on his behalf.   In 1974 Macumber was convicted for a double homicide that occurred in 1962, despite his assertion of innocence, questionable evidence linking Macumber to the crime, and a confession from a violent criminal.  Manifest Injustice artfully reconstructs the past, detailing the chain of events that led to Macumber’s conviction, and chronicles the present-day fight for his release.

You can learn more about the Arizona Justice Project and its work to overturn wrongful convictions in Arizona at

Update:  The Arizona Justice Project is hosting a conversation with Bill Macumber and Berry Siegel, the author of Manifest Injustice, on March 4th at 4:30pm in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Great Hall.   Autographed books will be available at the event and a reception will follow at 6pm.  See the event flyer for more details.

Law Library Annual Donation Drive for Pets

Since so many of us at the Law School enjoy the company of our furry friends we thought it might be nice to help animals less fortunate than our own pets with a donation drive for the Arizona Animal Welfare League and SPCA.    

Founded in 1971, the Arizona Animal Welfare League and SPCA is Arizona’s oldest and largest no-kill shelter. Their facilities provide a temporary home for nearly 2,000 dogs and cats every year. Their mission is to provide excellent care, protection and loving compassion for the life of the animals and to take a   leadership role in promoting humane values for the benefit of all animals and people. They are supported entirely by private funding.

A box to collect donations is located at the Circulation desk in the Law Library and there is also box located in the Law School near the information desk. Below is a list of items you may wish to donate:

  • Canned pate’ cat food
  • Canned dog food
  • Cat litter clumping and non-clumping
  • Laundry detergent
  • Bleach
  • Paper towels
  • Paper plates
  • New cat trees/towers
  • Litter pans

To see a list of items the Arizona Animal Welfare League especially needs, please click below. 

Arizona Animal Welfare League Wishlist

You can also make an online donation at the following web site: Online Donations

Donations will be accepted until December 28th.

Thank you for your generosity in supporting our furry friends & Happy Holidays from the Law Library staff.

State v. Federal Law – Medical Marijuana

Eighteen states (including Arizona) and the District of Columbia now allow for medical use of marijuana.  The medical marijuana laws of these states are in direct conflict with federal law, however, as the Controlled Substances Act prohibits the cultivation, distribution, and possession of marijuana.  This has created an incongruous situation in which an individual may be using medical marijuana in compliance with state law but is concurrently violating federal law, and thus exposing him or herself to federal prosecution.  While the U.S. Department of Justice stated in a 2009 Memorandum to U.S. Attorneys that federal prosecutors should generally not focus their resources on “individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana,” prosecution is still a real possibility.

It is yet to be seen how the federal government will respond to the state laws authorizing and regulating medical marijuana use, but if in the meantime you would like to learn more about the constitutional law issues raised by these laws  you can read through the recent Congressional Research Service report “Medical Marijuana: The Supremacy Clause, Federalism, and the Interplay Between State and Federal Laws.”

To learn more about the Medical Marijuana Program in Arizona check out the Arizona Department of Health Services webpage.

The Legal Response to Hate Speech

This Friday, October 26, the College of Law is hosting an event titled The Legal Response to Hate Speech: Should the U.S. be more like Europe?  The event will consist of a conversation between Jeremy Waldron, University Professor at NYU School of Law and James Weinstein, Amelia Lewis Professor of Constitutional Law at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, as well as a book signing and reception after the discussion.  You can get event details and reserve a ticket on the College of Law’s website.

If you are interested in this topic you may want to read Waldron’s new book, The Harm in Hate Speech, or another recent addition to the Law Library’s collection titled The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulation and Responses, edited by Michael Herz and Peter Molnar.

   In The Harm in Hate Speech, Waldron discusses the damage that hate speech does and compares American free speech laws to European laws which punish speech that “incites hatred” against an individual or group based on his or her race, ethnicity, religion, sex, or sexual orientation.   The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulations and Responses also has a comparative emphasis, as the authors consider whether it is possible to establish hate speech policies that balance free speech but also protect individuals and groups.

The Harm in Hate Speech is available in the law Library at Law Treatises KF9345 .W34 2012. The Content and Context of Hate Speech: Rethinking Regulations and Responses  is available in the Law Library at Law Treatises K5210 .C66 2010.

Register to Vote Today

If you’re planning to vote in this year’s elections, now is the time to make sure you are registered, as tomorrow, October 9, is the last day to register to vote in Arizona.  To register, go to the Voter Registration and Education page from the Arizona Secretary of State, Tom Horne.

Once you have registered check out Arizona’s page at for a list of such information as what ID is necessary for identification at the voting booth, the requirements for time off to vote, upcoming debates and forums, provisions for voters with disabilities, and more.

For those curious about ballot measures, the League of Women Voters of Arizona have put up a voter guide here, including summaries of each proposition, arguments for and against, and a list of supporters and opponents of each issue.

Not an Arizona voter?  No problem.  You can simply enter your voting address in the side form of or scroll down and choose your state to find out about voting there.