Category Archives: Events

New Titles in the Law Library Collection – Indigenous Peoples

In January the Indian Legal Program (ILP) at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University and the American Bar Association (ABA) are hosting the Intersection of Tribal Rights with Environmental, Energy and Resources Development Conference. The conference will focus on natural resource development, water quality and water rights, clean energy and climate change resiliency, and international best practices. The Law Library’s Indian Law collection has a number of books relevant to the subjects that will be explored at the conference – we have highlighted two new titles in this collection below.

A Nation Within: Navajo Land and Economic Development (Ezra Rosser, 2021)
In A Nation Within, Ezra Rosser explores the connection between land-use patterns and development in the Navajo Nation. Roughly the size of Ireland or West Virginia, the Navajo reservation has seen successive waves of natural resource-based development over the last century: grazing and over-grazing, oil and gas, uranium, and coal; yet Navajos continue to suffer from high levels of unemployment and poverty. Rosser shows the connection between the exploitation of these resources and the growth of the tribal government before turning to contemporary land use and development challenges. He argues that, in addition to the political challenges associated with any significant change, external pressures and internal corruption have made it difficult for the tribe to implement land reforms that could help provide space for economic development that would benefit the Navajo Nation and Navajo tribal members.

Indigenous Peoples, Consent and Rights: Troubling Subjects (Stephen Young, 2021)
Analyzing how Indigenous Peoples come to be identifiable as bearers of human rights, this book considers how individuals and communities claim the right of free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) as Indigenous peoples. According to international human rights discourse, ‘Indigenous peoples’ have the capacity to claim ‘free, prior and informed consent’ (FPIC) to influence and control decisions that concern First Nation Peoples. The book argues that the subject status of Indigenous peoples emerged out of international law in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Then, through a series of case studies, it considers how self-identifying Indigenous peoples, scholars, UN institutions and non-government organizations (NGOs) dispersed that subject-status and associated rights discourse through international and national legal contexts. It shows that those who claim international human rights as Indigenous peoples performatively become identifiable subjects of international law – but further demonstrates that this does not, however, provide them with control over, or emancipation from, a state-based legal system.

Sean Harrington, Electronic Resources Librarian

Cameras and Mobile Devices in Courtrooms: Oct. 17 at the Cronkite School

This Friday, October 17, there will be panel discussion at ASU’s The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in downtown Phoenix. The topic will be:

Cameras and Mobile Devices in Courtrooms — New Rules, New Newsgathering Challenges

The panelists:

  •  Hon. Robert M. Brutinel, Associate Justice, Arizona Supreme Court
  • Hon. Joseph C. Welty, Criminal Presiding Judge, Maricopa County Superior Court
  • Bill Montgomery, Maricopa County Attorney
  • Jennifer Willmott, criminal defense attorney
  • Cathie Batbie, news director at KVOA-TV (Channel 4-NBC) in Tucson

The panel discussion will run from 9:00a.m. to 10:30 a.m. From 8:30a.m. to 9:00 a.m., there will be a continental breakfast reception, and chance for folks to get acquainted.ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication is located at 555 N. Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix. The event will be held in the school’s First Amendment Forum, which is located on the second floor. 

Admission is free, and the public is invited, as well as ASU students and faculty.  The First Amendment Coalition of Arizona, Inc., is the event sponsor.

Constitution Day Event: Polarization in the Court?

ConstitutionIf you would like to celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th there will be a program at Hayden Library.  Join us for Hayden Library’s Constitution Day Celebration and hear Dr. Valerie Hoekstra speak about Polarization in the Court?  Prof. Hoekstra is an Associate Professor of Political Science in the School of Politics and Global Studies. The lecture will take place on Wednesday September 17th at 10:30am at Hayden Library in room Room C-6A, on the Tempe campus. The lecture is free.

For more information contact Dan Stanton at danton@asu.edu or 480-965-1798