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New Law Library Services

Welcome to a new school year.  The Law Library staff is excited to see all the new faces and our returning students. We were very busy over the summer developing new services to make your life easier.  Three of the new services are:

Scan on Demand
Delivery on Demand
20 – Minute Trainings

You can read more about our new services below.

Scan on Demand
Do you need help gathering your research? Strapped for time? Let the Law Library HELP! We will scan and email to you print materials you need from the Law Library or any of the ASU Libraries for free. … Continue Reading

National Grammar Day

The importance of good grammar, particularly for legal practitioners, cannot be emphasized enough.  Good grammar is the foundation of good writing, and good writing is essential to both high achievement in law school and success in legal practice.   With that in mind (and in celebration of National Grammar Day today) we have provided a few resources below which you can use to increase your grammatical mastery.  Since words are the tools of the legal profession, time spent brushing up on your grammar is never wasted.

 

Professor Tamara Herrera’s “Legal Writing” column in the … Continue Reading

Collaborative Research for the Digital Age

While there have been significant changes in the realm of legal research (such as the shift from print to digital resources) conducting legal research is still often a solitary endeavor.  Two new websites are trying to change that, however, and have provided platforms designed to make online legal research a collaborative enterprise: Casetext and Mootus.

casetext.14b50743c8b2

Casetext is a “community of lawyers, law professors, and law students helping each other understand the law by annotating key legal documents.”  The website contains a database of over a million cases, statutes, regulations, and contracts … Continue Reading

The Socratic Method and You

“I cannot teach anybody anything.  I can only make them think.”
- Socrates

As a law student you have no doubt experienced the Socratic Method instructional model, which is based on the asking and answering of questions in class with the goal of stimulating critical thinking.  You can thank Christopher Columbus Landell for that, who as the Dean of Harvard Law School from 1870 to 1895 introduced this method to legal education.  Before Landell, legal instruction was based on the lecture model, in which students memorized material from an instructional textbook and were lectured on that material in class.

Many law professors now … Continue Reading

The Importance of a Good Vocabulary for Law Students

 

A good vocabulary is essential for a law student.  It allows you to communicate effectively, boosts your powers of persuasion, and helps you make a good impression.  In his article for the September 2013 ABA Journal, Professor Bryan Garner cites research reviewed by University of Virginia professor emeritus E.D. Hirsch Jr., who states that studies have solidly established the correlation between vocabulary and real-world ability.  In fact, Hirsch affirms that the research reveals “there’s no better index to accumulated knowledge and general competence than the size of a person’s vocabulary.”

To … Continue Reading

From the Archives: Reading Period

While the seats are packed, it’s pretty quiet here in the Law Library, as students are taking full advantage of the Reading Period to prepare for final exams.

Law students have long taken refuge in the library for quiet study. Before 1993, the ASU Law Library was housed in the basement and other areas of Armstrong Hall. Without a free-standing building with dedicated study rooms (which, by the way, are in high demand this time of year – reservations are recommended!), students hunkered down at study carrells or nooks and crannies throughout the space.

To commemorate this Reading Period, we thought you’d enjoy these photos of … Continue Reading

How to Find Happiness in the Practice of Law

While searching the College of Law Archives for items to include in Professor Feller’s upcoming memorial service, I came across a gem in the Spring 1989 Forum (a former periodic publication of the College of Law): The Commencement Address, given by Paul F. Eckstein, to the graduating class of 1988.

Good speeches stand the test of time, and 25 years later, Eckstein’s advice is still solid.
How to Find Happiness in the Practice of Law:

1. “(A)lways be respectful of those who are your adversaries and understand that your role as an advocate or negotiator deles not require you to assume the demeanor of those you represent…

2. (Do) what … Continue Reading

Real World Legal Research: Top Ten Tips Workshop

Beth DiFelice, Assistant Director of the Ross-Blakley Law Library, will be giving a workshop next week on the most important legal research strategies you need to know before starting your legal position this summer or embarking on your career.

The hour-long workshop will be offered twice:
Tuesday, April 2nd: 12-15-1:15pm in Library 119
Wednesday, April 3rd: 3-4pm in Room 118

Law Library Closing at 9:00 Tomorrow (Thursday)

Due to a planned power outage, the Law Library will be closing at 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, 2013 (tomorrow).

The All Night Study Room will be unavailable tomorrow night.

We apologize for the inconvenience. We will reopen at 7:00 a.m. Friday morning.

Library Faculty Display Case

There are two new items in the Library Faculty Display Case this week.

First is the cover of Sandra Day O’Connor’s newest book, Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court.  The book itself is available for check out from the Law Library.

Second is an article from Professor Adam Chodorow called “Death and Taxes and Zombies,” which was published in the Iowa Law Review this month.  If you would like to read the article, it is available through SSRN online, or the journal is available at the Circulation Desk for temporary use.